Laura Ingraham Is Not Racist, But She Is Wrong

The leftwing blowback against Laura Ingraham comes from the same place Ingraham’s comments come from. The left quickly stomped on her comments made on Fox News the other day about immigration. They called her “racist” for comments suggesting people are coming here who we did not want and who are fundamentally changing the culture away from something that is American.

“Racism” has become the guttural rallying cry for a left in America who see anyone they disagree with as racist unworthy of debate. In their mostly white urban and hipster bubbles where diversity means skin color might change, bu the ideas must stay exactly the same, progressives understand less and less of the American heartland. They have, as well, decided that since most of the population lives in and around their bubbles, there is no reason to understand the hicks, rubes, and racists who do not move into their bubbles and conform.

Safe spaces now exist because progressives no longer have the emotional and mental maturity to exist outside their bubbled worlds of urbane sophistry. When they encounter an idea like what Ingraham uttered, they default to it being a racist view from that land they care nothing about and wish would just shut up.

But Ingraham’s view is not racist. It was not well thought out and it is decidedly wrong. Ingraham is wrong because she is tacitly embracing a leftwing fallacy — demography is destiny.

To the extent American culture changes, it has always changed. Tacos are now as American as hamburgers. Chinese one night a week is a new American tradition. And more of our kids are learning Spanish just as so many Hispanic kids speak English. The problem is that we, as a society, are building up barriers that not only discourage, but actively prevent assimilation.

The left treats assimilation as a bad thing these days. Gone is the melting pot where everything is blended into a common whole. The left loves the idea of the salad bowl where we are all tossed in together, but keeping our unique parts and covered in a sickly sweet socialist dressing. Those sorts of societies are unstable.

Both the right and the left need to get out into the heartland and meet more people. Both sides have moved into bubbles where everyone thinks the same way and often looks the same. It has caused a very divided nation where we all, as a whole, have fewer things we enjoy in common. Even comedy, which used to unite us, is highly politicized these days.

The people calling Ingraham “racist” are as wrong as Ingraham is to think demography is destiny. Both statements come not only from a lack of understanding others, but an unwillingness to even try.